Newsletter – Issue 15 – July 2018

Introduction

The OpenChain Project returned to Asia with significant outreach activities announced for the Chinese language supply chain. We continued to release case studies from Japanese and global stakeholders. The project reference material was also expanded with the release of a second and more detailed set of tooling slides under CC-0.

Events

The OpenChain Project had a strong focus on Taiwan this month, announcing three workshops from the 9th to 12th of August, one of which constitutes the first legal track for the COSCUP conference. COSCUP is the premier open source conference in Taipei and usually attracts a couple of thousand attendees. Each of these workshops will be represented by the OpenChain Project and our friends from Sony and Panasonic.

The first OpenChain workshop was announced for the MOXA company and university in South Taipei with a focus on providing an easy starting point for engaging with compliance issues:
https://www.openchainproject.org/news/2018/07/12/openchain-announces-workshop-in-taipei

The second workshop was announced in conjunction with the Open Culture Foundation (OFC) and focused on providing an intermediate introduction to license management and corporate strategy:
https://www.openchainproject.org/news/2018/07/10/openchain-announces-legal-track-coscup

Finally, the legal track at the COSCUP conference on the 12th August was given a focus on end-to-end compliance discussions to guide project managers from A to Z around key requirements and efficiencies:
https://www.openchainproject.org/news/2018/07/17/openchain-announces-legal-track-coscup-12th-august

Contributions

The OpenChain Project shared two new sets of case studies with the community-at-large.

The first collection of case studies constituted three consumer device company case studies. These encompassed company approaches, priorities and engagement with OpenChain. They are provided in anonymous format from major international stakeholders in both OpenChain and open source more generally.
https://www.openchainproject.org/news/2018/07/12/openchain-announces-three-consumer-devices-case-studies

The second collection constituted four anonymous open source compliance case studies from Japan. These case studies mark the conclusion of our sequence of releases that saw information shared by Toyota, Hitachi, Sony and many more.
https://www.openchainproject.org/news/2018/07/17/openchain-announces-four-more-japanese-case-studies

Releases

The OpenChain Project announced the release of a second set of tooling slides. These slides were contributed by Software Compliance Academy, one of our strategic partners in Germany, and built on our first release in May. As with all contributions to the OpenChain learning materials (curriculum and onboarding), these slides are published under the CC-0 license, effectively public domain.
https://www.openchainproject.org/news/2018/07/16/openchain-announces-second-set-of-reference-tooling-slides

Improved Outreach

Work continued on our Japanese translation of the website and web app. Due to some reworking around the code our release schedule slipped from July to a projected late August release:
https://www.openchainproject.org/news/2018/06/21/openchain-announces-japanese-website

Work has also begun on the Chinese translation of the OpenChain website. Expect further announcements around this during August.

Summary

The OpenChain Project continues to execute around its strategy of building international bridges and knowledge sharing both in the English language and local languages by country. Of particular note was the release of further case studies and expanded tooling slides as a direct response to community requests. August will see a continuation of outreach activities and a deep dive into our specification update discussions.

License and Trademarks

Copyright 2018 The Linux Foundation. This newsletter is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-ND 2.0). Please feel free to share it onwards! OpenChain is a trademark of The Linux Foundation. It may be used according to The Linux Foundation Trademark Policy and the OpenChain Terms of Use. All other trademarks belong to their respective owners.